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DC Federal Healthcare Fraud Cases

DC federal healthcare fraud cases are intensely prosecuted through investigation. The investigative agents can be quite aggressive in these cases, especially when seeking jail time and restitution. Prosecutors frequently pursue long jail sentences and maximum amounts of restitution and forfeitures. If you are facing charges, you should seek the services of a dedicated federal healthcare fraud lawyer. Let an accomplished attorney fight for you and help you reach a favorable outcome to your case.

Common Mistakes Made by Defendants in Healthcare Fraud Cases

One of the most common mistakes a person charged with healthcare fraud makes is ignoring the situation and hoping it disappears. Another problem is when people think they can talk their way out the charges. They meet with the FBI agents and tell them anything they believe will lead the prosecution in a direction away from them. Unfortunately, that turns into a statement the federal prosecutor can then use against the defendant at trial. It could also add new charges for false statements. If the individual makes a false statement before a grand jury, a charge of perjury could be made. These are federal offenses that can add additional jail time to someone’s sentence for the original healthcare fraud charges.

Hiring counsel immediately is the first thing one should do when they realize they are the target of a healthcare investigation or they become aware that an investigation is being conducted. They may or may not be the target. If one knows an investigator wants to talk to them, they may be implicated in some way and should hire an attorney immediately.

Healthcare Fraud Penalties and Consequences

DC federal healthcare fraud cases carry significant penalties and long-term repercussions. Sometimes healthcare fraud charges include other types of fraud charges, including mail fraud and wire fraud. The various fraud charges carry up to ten years in jail or up to 20 years in jail if there is serious bodily injury.

The sentences for healthcare fraud are frequently driven by the amount of what was taken. Someone who is accused of taking $5,000 faces a different sentence than someone who is accused of taking $50,000 or $500,000.

A person facing fraud charges should have an attorney who can help them identify their guidelines calculation because judges usually follow the guidelines. It is critical that one knows their sentencing guidelines calculations before making final decisions about accepting a plea.

How an Attorney Could Help

When someone chooses a lawyer to represent them in a healthcare fraud case, they should hire one with experience, especially in DC federal healthcare fraud cases. It is crucial to have an attorney who is knowledgeable about how these cases move forward and has experience dealing with fraud cases in general and, specifically, healthcare fraud cases. A person should have a lawyer who understands the prosecutors and judges in the particular jurisdiction to help them make informed decisions and build a strong, aggressive defense.

When building a defense, a healthcare fraud lawyer tries to get as much information as possible right away. They determine the focus of the investigators and prosecutors related to the healthcare fraud case. The lawyer may do their own investigation to identify appropriate defenses or convince the prosecutor that criminal charges against the defendant are not warranted.